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Philosophy

A subject guide for the Department of Philosophy

Welcome to the Philosophy Subject Guide

This guide has been created by your Subject Liaison Librarian (see right) to provide students of Philosophy with information about the Library. The guide includes details of the relevant online and print resources, with lists of the key titles included throughout. 

The guide also provides support to use the Library's resources effectively, including how-to videos, online chat and details of further training available through Library@Skills.

This guide will help you to understand what the Library provides, which resources to use and how to use them.

Subject Collections

The Philosophy printed collection is located in the UCL Main Library, in addition to these open shelves there are off-site stores for rare and valuable special collections and the lesser used, older material.

The Library provides online access to a huge range of materials. Here are some of the key databases in this subject, providing online versions of everything from works of philosophy, to criticism, to historical newspapers:

Further information about all these resources and more can be found in this guide.

Where to study?

You can choose to study in any of UCL's Libraries and study spaces, there are bookable study spaces and group work spaces. There is also space which is for postgraduate use only.

New books in Philosophy

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Just Married

The case for marriage equality and monogamy in a democratic society The institution of marriage stands at a critical juncture. As gay marriage equality gains acceptance in law and public opinion, questions abound regarding marriage's future. Will same-sex marriage lead to more radical marriage reform? Should it? Antonin Scalia and many others on the right warn of a slippery slope from same-sex marriage toward polygamy, adult incest, and the dissolution of marriage as we know it. Equally, many academics, activists, and intellectuals on the left contend that there is no place for monogamous marriage as a special status defined by law. Just Married demonstrates that both sides are wrong: the same principles of democratic justice that demand marriage equality for same-sex couples also lend support to monogamous marriage. Stephen Macedo displays the groundlessness of arguments against same-sex marriage and defends marriage as a public institution against those who would eliminate its special status or supplant it with private arrangements. 

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Egalitarianism

Egalitarianism, the view that equality matters, attracts a great deal of attention amongst contemporary political theorists. And yet it has turned out to be surprisingly difficult to provide a fully satisfactory egalitarian theory. The cutting-edge articles in Egalitarianism move the debate forward. They are written by some of the leading political philosophers in the field.Recent issues in the debate over equality are given careful consideration: the distinction between 'telic' and 'deontic' egalitarianism; prioritarianism and the so-called 'levelling down objection' to egalitarianism; whether egalitarian justice should have 'whole lives' or some subset thereof as its temporal focus; the implications of Scanlon's contractualist account of the value of choice for egalitarian justice; and the question of whether non-human animals fall within the scope ofegalitarianism and if so, what the implications are. 

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Cut of the Real

A leading scholar of gender studies and speculative realism carves a universal conception of identity and the subject. Katerina Kolozova reclaims the relevance of categories traditionally rendered "unthinkable" by postmodern feminist philosophies, critically repositioning poststructuralist feminist philosophy and gender/queer studies.

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The Presocratics and the Supernatural

This book examines the relationship between magic, philosophy and the investigation of nature in presocratic Greece. Did the presocratic thinkers, often praised for their rejection of the supernatural, still believe in gods and the divine and the efficacy of magical practices? Did they use animism, astrology, numerology and mysticism in their explanations of the world? This book analyses the evidence in detail and argues that we need to look at each of these beliefs in context.